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St. Jude celebrated Arthur W. Nienhuis’ legacy with the first Arthur W. Nienhuis Research Symposium featuring gene therapy researchers
Apr 3, 2024, 13:40

St. Jude celebrated Arthur W. Nienhuis’ legacy with the first Arthur W. Nienhuis Research Symposium featuring gene therapy researchers

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital shared on their LinkedIn:

“‘If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.’ – Sir Isaac Newton

At St. Jude, Arthur W. Nienhuis was among the giants that laid the foundation for the future of discoveries in the quest to cure pediatric catastrophic diseases. The former St. Jude CEO was a world leader in the development of hematopoiesis, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and gene therapy.

Last week, St. Jude celebrated his legacy with the first Arthur W. Nienhuis Research Symposium featuring gene therapy researchers. The day-long event brought former trainees, colleagues, and members of the Nienhuis family to the St. Jude campus to discuss the latest research on emerging therapies for sickle cell disease and other disorders.

‘What an honor to take part in the St. Jude Arthur W. Nienhuis Research Symposium and share about Dr. Nienhuis’ lasting impact on me as a mentor, colleague, and friend. And his incredible contributions to the field of hematology and gene therapy,’ shared Griffin P. Rodgers, Director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Under his leadership from 1993-2004, Nienhuis strengthened programs in experimental hematology, bone marrow transplantation, pediatric oncology and infectious diseases. Convinced that gene editing would transform the science of medicine, Nienhuis recruited scientists, established programs and built a GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) facility, where St. Jude could produce gene therapy vectors, monoclonal antibodies and vaccines. Notable projects include research on X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (SCID-X1) and the development of gene transfer for the treatment of hemophilia.

Nienhuis laid the blueprint for present-day St. Jude operations, research and discovery. We honor his life and legacy as we continue to expand on his vision for care and treatment.”

Source: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/LinkedIn